November 6 @ 11 AM EST

Online

Tía For­tu­na is in the process of leav­ing her Mia­mi home for an assist­ed liv­ing facil­i­ty. Con­front­ed with the inevitabil­i­ty of this event, she wise­ly tells her niece, ​“Estrel­la, it’s time to say good­bye and wish for mazal bueno.” Chil­dren read­ing the book will learn about Sephardic cul­ture and also feel reas­sured that Tía Fortuna’s atti­tude, as much as mazal, will enable her to adjust to a new life.

Ruth Behar was born in Havana, Cuba to a mixed Ashke­­nazi-Sephardic fam­i­ly. She grew up in New York, and became the first Lati­na to win a MacArthur Genius Grant. A cul­tur­al anthro­pol­o­gist, poet, and fic­tion writer, she explores Jew­ish iden­ti­ty in Cuban con­texts in her award-win­n­ing mid­­dle-grade nov­els, Lucky Bro­ken Girl and Let­ters from Cuba, and pic­ture book, Tía For­tu­na’s New Home. A grad­u­ate of Wes­leyan and Prince­ton, Behar is the James W. Fer­nan­dez Dis­tin­guished Pro­fes­sor at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Michi­gan, Ann Arbor.

November 6 @ 11 AM EST

Online

Shoham wears a golden bangle on her wrist, just like her Nana Aziza. Their bangles jingle when they cook, and glitter in the sun. When Shoham and her family must leave Iraq, they are allowed to take only one suitcase each. They may take no jewelry. Shoham has the important job of carrying Nana's homemade pita bread, which Nana says they will eat when they get to Israel. But when they finally arrive and it is time to eat, Shoham bites into something hard inside the pita bread. Sarah Sas­soon was raised in Syd­ney, Aus­tralia, sur­round­ed by her lov­ing Judeo-Ara­bic speak­ing Iraqi Jew­ish immi­grant fam­i­ly. When she mar­ried, she immi­grat­ed to Johan­nes­burg, South Africa and with her hus­band and four sons, made Aliyah. She lives in Jerusalem. Sarah loves writ­ing poet­ry and sto­ries about cross­ing bor­ders and oth­er worlds. Shoham’s Ban­gle is Sarah’s first children’s book.

November 6 @ 7 PM EST

Online

A must-read guide for small busi­ness own­ers nav­i­gat­ing a crit­i­cal turn­ing point: when you either lev­el up or give up. It’s nev­er been eas­i­er to start a busi­ness – and it’s nev­er been hard­er to scale it. Half of new busi­ness­es in Amer­i­ca don’t make it past five years. Stacey Abrams and Lara Hodg­son want to help today’s entre­pre­neurs beat the odds by reveal­ing the unseen teth­ers that keep small busi­ness­es from grow­ing and thriving.

Heather Cabot is an author, award-win­ning jour­nal­ist, keynote speak­er and for­mer ABC News cor­re­spon­dent and anchor. She spe­cial­izes in nar­ra­tive non­fic­tion sto­ry­telling high­light­ing inspir­ing tales of inno­va­tion, enter­prise, grit and resilience.

November 7 @ 11 AM EST

Online

A Play for the End of the World begins with an impos­si­ble ques­tion, “‘How do you help a child in this world? How do you teach him about what’s to come? The after­life?’” Pan Dok­tor, head of an orphan­age in the War­saw Ghet­to, asks this ques­tion as he intro­duces the play that attempts to answer it by invok­ing the pow­er of imag­i­na­tion. The chil­dren of the orphan­age per­form it four days before depor­ta­tions begin. Only two sur­vive, Jaryk and Misha.

Jai Chakrabar­ti is the author of the nov­el A Play for the End of the World (Knopf), which won the Nation­al Jew­ish Book Award for debut fic­tion and is long-list­ed for the PEN/​Faulkner Award. He is the author of the forth­com­ing sto­ry col­lec­tion A Small Sac­ri­fice for an Enor­mous Hap­pi­ness (Knopf, 2023). His short fic­tion has appeared in numer­ous jour­nals and has been anthol­o­gized in The O. Hen­ry Prize Sto­ries, The Best Amer­i­can Short Sto­ries, and award­ed a Push­cart Prize. He was an Emerg­ing Writer Fel­low with A Pub­lic Space and received an MFA in Cre­ative Writ­ing from Brook­lyn Col­lege and is a trained com­put­er sci­en­tist. Born in Kolkata, India, he now lives in New York with his family.

NOVEMBER 7 @ 7 PM EST

Online

At thir­teen years old, Stephen Mills is cho­sen for spe­cial atten­tion by the direc­tor of his Jew­ish sum­mer camp, a charis­mat­ic social work­er intent on becom­ing his friend. Stephen places his trust in this author­i­ty fig­ure, who first grooms and then molests him for two years. The after­shocks rip through his adult life: self-loathing, drug abuse, pet­ty crime, and hor­rif­ic night­mares, all made worse by the dis­cov­ery that his abuser is molest­ing oth­er boys. Only phys­i­cal and men­tal col­lapse bring Stephen to con­front the truth of his boy­hood and begin the painful process of recov­ery — as well as a decades-long cru­sade to stop a ser­i­al preda­tor, find jus­tice, and hold to account those who failed the chil­dren in their care. The trau­ma of sex­u­al abuse is shared by one out of every six men, yet very few have bro­ken their silence. Cho­sen elo­quent­ly speaks for those count­less oth­ers and their fam­i­lies. It is the indeli­ble sto­ry of a man who faces his tor­ment and his tor­men­tor and, in the process, is made whole.

Stephen Mills is the co-author with Roger Fouts of Next of Kin: My Con­ver­sa­tions with Chim­panzees, a Los Ange­les Times Best Book of the Year. He has worked with the Nat­ur­al Resources Defense Coun­cil since 1983, build­ing cam­paigns that have mobi­lized mil­lions of Amer­i­cans in sup­port of envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion. He lives in Cal­i­for­nia with his wife, Susan.

NOVEMBER 8 @ 1 PM EST

Online

Mar­jorie Mar­golies’s Jew­ish father always said that you should aspire to change another’s life. That con­cept of tikkun olam, was instilled in her from an ear­ly age and she was deter­mined to apply the con­cept to her own fam­i­ly. Mar­jorie’s fam­i­ly grew expo­nen­tial­ly. She adopt­ed two girls from Viet­nam and Korea, mar­ried a Jew­ish Con­gress­man with four daugh­ters, and spon­sored a Catholic refugee fam­i­ly from Viet­nam bring­ing the num­ber of kids under her roof to eleven. Mar­jorie had a Jew­ish home, but one of her pri­or­i­ties was to instill in her kids’ respect for all faiths. They cel­e­brat­ed Han­ukkah and Christ­mas. Sun­day morn­ings meant Sun­day school – both Catholic and Jew­ish. They did Seders and Catholic Mass­es. They said Jew­ish and Catholic prayers. Her chil­dren mar­ried in Jew­ish or ecu­meni­cal cer­e­monies. It was an organ­ic way to make every­one feel includ­ed yet tol­er­ant of oth­er belief sys­tems. Mar­jorie’s book is the sto­ry of this journey.

Mar­jorie Mar­golies is a for­mer mem­ber of Con­gress from Penn­syl­va­nia, a jour­nal­ist, a wom­en’s rights advo­cate, and a serendip­i­tous moth­er many times over. She is per­haps best remem­bered for being the first unmar­ried Amer­i­can to adopt a for­eign child and for cast­ing the decid­ing vote in favor of Pres­i­dent Clin­ton’s 1993 bud­get, the Omnibus Rec­on­cil­i­a­tion Act. Born in Philadel­phia, Mar­golies grad­u­at­ed from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Penn­syl­va­nia. She worked as a jour­nal­ist with NBC and its owned and oper­at­ed sta­tions for 25 years, win­ning five Emmy Awards.

NOVEMBER 8 @ 7 PM EST

Online

The co-founder of the menswear start­up Bono­bos opens up about the strug­gle with bipo­lar dis­or­der that near­ly cost him every­thing in this grip­ping, rad­i­cal­ly hon­est mem­oir of men­tal ill­ness and entrepreneurship.

Andy Dunn co-found­ed the ecom­merce-dri­ven menswear brand Bono­bos in 2007 and served as CEO through its 2017 acqui­si­tion by Wal­mart. As an angel investor and through his ven­ture cap­i­tal firm Red Swan, Dunn has backed more than eighty star­tups, includ­ing War­by Park­er, Oscar, and Coin­base. Dunn serves on the boards of Mon­i­ca + Andy, an organ­ic baby appar­el com­pa­ny found­ed by his sis­ter, and the tech non­prof­it Raised By Us. Named to For­tune’s 40 under 40 list in 2018, he is a grad­u­ate of North­west­ern Uni­ver­si­ty and the Stan­ford Grad­u­ate School of Busi­ness. He lives with his wife and their son in Chicago.

NOVEMBER 9 @ 1 PM EST

Online

Cook­ing alla Giu­dia is the ulti­mate trib­ute to the won­der­ful­ly rich, yet still large­ly unknown, culi­nary her­itage of the Jews of Italy. With a col­lec­tion of kosher recipes from all regions of Italy, includ­ing plen­ty of veg­an, veg­e­tar­i­an, and gluten-free options, author Benedet­ta Jas­mine Guet­ta is on a mis­sion to tell the sto­ry of how the Jews changed Ital­ian food, to pre­serve these recipes, and to share with home cooks the extra­or­di­nary dish­es pre­pared in the Jew­ish com­mu­ni­ties of Italy. High­light­ed through­out the book are menus with region­al Ital­ian spe­cial­ties, along with short, use­ful guides to the Ital­ian cities with Jew­ish his­to­ry. The book will show how to inte­grate the recipes into your every­day meals and hol­i­day tra­di­tions as well.

Benedet­ta Jas­mine Guet­ta is an Ital­ian food writer and pho­tog­ra­ph­er. She was born in Milan, but she lives in San­ta Mon­i­ca, Cal­i­for­nia. In 2009, she cofound­ed a web­site called Lab­na, the only Jewish/​Kosher cook­ing blog in Italy, spe­cial­iz­ing in Ital­ian and Jew­ish cui­sine. Since then, she has been spread­ing the word about the mar­vels of Ital­ian Jew­ish food in Italy and abroad, teach­ing the recipes of the cui­sine to a grow­ing num­ber of peo­ple in cook­ing schools, syn­a­gogues, and com­mu­ni­ty cen­ters, among oth­er insti­tu­tions. Her work has been fea­tured in numer­ous news out­lets in Italy and abroad, includ­ing the Wash­ing­ton Post, Cos­mopoli­tan, Elle à Table, Saveur, and Tablet. Guet­ta has pre­vi­ous­ly coau­thored two cook­books in Ital­ian; this is her first Eng­lish-lan­guage cookbook.

NOVEMBER 9 @ 7 PM EST

Online

This mem­oir traces the Holo­caust through the eyes of young Nathan Porem­ba and exam­ines the dif­fi­cult emo­tion­al and phys­i­cal choic­es he made to survive. His unmatched resilience is a tes­ta­ment to his will to live. Through­out, Nathan nev­er acqui­esced to anti­semitism and he con­sis­tent­ly resist­ed his tor­men­tors as his father had before the Holocaust.

Joel is the son of Holo­caust sur­vivor Nathan Porem­ba. Stunned after hear­ing his father give his tes­ti­mo­ny to the Shoah Foun­da­tion in 1998, it took 21 years and a trip to Israel for Joel to watch his father’s video tes­ti­mo­ny. Busi­ness attor­ney; grad­u­ate of West­ern State Uni­ver­si­ty, Col­lege of Law and the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cal­i­for­nia, San Diego.

NOVEMBER 10 @ 7 PM EST

Online

From the New York Times best­selling author of I See You Made an Effort, comes a time­ly and hilar­i­ous chron­i­cle of down­ward mobil­i­ty, finan­cial and emo­tion­al. With sig­na­ture ​“sharp wit” (NPR), Annabelle Gur­witch gives an irrev­er­ent and empa­thet­ic voice to a gen­er­a­tion hurtling into their next chap­ter with no safe­ty net and proves that our no-frills new nor­mal does­n’t mean a deficit of humor.
Annabelle Gur­witch is a Thurber Prize for Amer­i­can Humor Writ­ing final­ist and New York Times best­selling author of five books, most recent­ly You’re Leav­ing When? Adven­tures in Down­ward Mobil­i­ty (Coun­ter­point, now out in paper­back) a New York Times’ Favorite Book About Healthy Liv­ing 2021 and a Good Morn­ing Amer­i­ca Must Read. She was the long­time host of Din­ner & a Movie on TBS, a reg­u­lar NPR con­trib­u­tor, and has writ­ten for The New York­er, New York Times, The Wash­ing­ton Post, Los Ange­les Review of Books, and WSJ amongst oth­er pub­li­ca­tions. She co-hosts the Tiny Vic­to­ries pod­cast on the Max­i­mum Fun Pod­cast Network.